Providing grounds for the greening of human language.

 

 

 

 

Father-Daughter Dance by Patricia Karamesines

by Jonathon | 2.19.14

baroque staircase Amsterdam

(For Clinton F. Larson)

How long did I look in that face, admit
that voice? He left his door unlocked to me,
kept ice cream money in a drawer. He fit
his office to my urchin company.

Those years I spent his foundling, each day waking,
I toyed on his baroque and spiraled stair.
“Look, here is Milton. See this sentence snaking?
These coils bend on forever. Do you dare?”

Oh, did I! Laughing, he bade me to make free.
I wound that eager staircase where it led
then met with the wall in his eternity.
How sharper than a serpent’s tooth, said he.

Our love acquired fierce shades of high Shakespeare:
‘Struth, I was his Cordelia, he my Lear.

____________________________________________________

Patricia Karamesines1Patricia Karamesines {p.karamesines@gmail.com} is the author of The Pictograph Murders (Signature Books 2004), an award-winning mystery novel set in the Four Corners area. Her poetry appears in the landmark anthology Fire in the Pasture (Peculiar Pages 2011) and has also been published in Dialogue and Irreantum. A long time ago, she was the founding editor of BYU’s literary journal Inscape, a feat she remains satisfied with. She has won numerous awards for her poetry and essays. She writes for A Motley Vision and runs the nature writing blog Wilderness Interface Zone that advocates for the greening of human language. Currently, she is an English tutor and adjunct at Utah State University-Eastern Blanding where she works closely with the university extension’s Native American student population.

4 Responses to Father-Daughter Dance by Patricia Karamesines

  1. SteveP

    Wonderful!

  2. Patricia K

    Thank you, Steve.

  3. Sarah Dunster

    So well done. Love it.

  4. Lora

    Mentor poetry, how neat!

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