Tag Archives: archaeology

Field Notes #11: Winter Solstice 2010, Part Five

Parts one, two, three, and four.

The mid-sized Ancestral Puebloan site sitting up on that “erosional layer of lower strata” (love that phrase) of Crossfire’s east cliffs is one of my favorites because of the serene view it offers down-canyon.  From what I’ve seen of that portion of Crossfire, including about a mile or so of what lies below the “No Drive Zone,” the farther south the canyon runs the wider it opens out and the higher the cliffs soar above its floor.  This Pueblo II-Pueblo III site’s impressive field of view takes in several of the canyon’s other ruins, including the first site across canyon that the archaeologist and I visited and, possibly, the tower. An ATV trail, badly eroded now as its illegality has come clear and nobody wants to risk keeping it up, crosses this site and runs onto the mesa east of Crossfire.  Sometimes I climb just above the ruin and sit on a flat rock jutting from the canyon wall out of which the trail was carved.  It’s nice up there, the size of the place intimates itself more deeply, and I feel the canyon’s inclusiveness fold me in. Continue reading Field Notes #11: Winter Solstice 2010, Part Five

Field Notes #11: Winter Solstice 2010, Part Two

Part One below on the “Home” page or click here.

As the archaeologist and I pushed uphill through sage and rabbit brush, he stopped to explain, quite diplomatically and in precise language, that he was in the canyon doing work pursuant to the BLM’s weighing a county government proposal to establish an ATV right-of-way through Crossfire, length to be determined.  Having lately become one of the canyon’s resident creatures, I found this information intriguing. Continue reading Field Notes #11: Winter Solstice 2010, Part Two