Tag Archives: Dayna Patterson

Some Words by Dayna Patterson

Abandoned_Jewish_cemetry_in_Trstín_01

 

Divorced from their meanings,

some words have lovely sound.

 

Poo,

with its soft plosive puh,

the same oo as in moon,

a word poets are fond of.

 

Chlamydia

could be a beautiful vine

with violet petals unfurling

around the kitchen bay window.

 

Balaclava

might refer to the delicate,

pale collar bones

of a water nymph.

 

Bergen-Belsen

could be generic for sanctuary,

a garden with no corpse flowers,

no odor of decay.

 

Bashar Hafez al-Assad

could be the name of a saint,

Saint of the underdog, of lost

buttons, of broken crockery.

____________________________

Dayna Patterson is Poetry Editor at Psaltery & Lyre. For more, go here.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons by Doronenko, 2012, of an abandoned Jewish Cemetery in Trstin.

Spider Line by Dayna Patterson

Photo by James Lindsey, 2003 via Wikimedia Commons

As I walk on a warm evening,
an invisible strand of spider silk
lands across my neck.

Another snags my elbow.
I brush at them,
but they are tricky to unhook.

Where is the spider
who set this clever snare?
I’m not near a tree or pole

or any structure for that matter.
This spider has cast his line far
into the river of open air,

hoping for a yellow hopper,
which he will reel in
and roast over a cookfire.

The smell of his catch will waft
through the grass to make his neighbors’
pinhole mouths water.

After a fine meal, he’ll lie down
in a hammock of homespun
and stare at the sparking stars,

each one a tantalizing firefly.

_________________________________
Dayna Patterson

Dayna recently moved to the Northwest from Texas. She is the mother of two and Poetry Editor for Psaltery & Lyre. Her chapbooks, Loose Threads and Mothering, are available from Flutter Press. Other work has appeared or is forthcoming in BlazeVOX, Borderline, Clover, Decades Review, Dialogue, Flutter Poetry Journal, Front Porch Review, North American Review, Segullah, and Sunstone, among others.

 

 

Photo by James Lindsey, 2003 via Wikimedia Commons.